A Return To Blogging!

Everyone loves a comeback, or at least the idea of one. The problem is that comebacks aren’t always successful. Think Michael Jordan, Bjorn Borg, and Lance Armstrong. Their attempts to return to their sports certainly gained excitement; however, the didn’t reach the high levels of success that they were known for. Their comebacks left us thinking, maybe it might have been better if they just never came back. Their legacies would have remained in tact and we would always remember them as the greatest athletes in history. And while some may argue that these three men ARE still some of the greatest athletes in history, it isn’t without a “but.” (I guess it isn’t entirely fair to call a 3rd place finishing the tournde France, qualifying for Wimbledon and scoring 55 points to become the top scorer on the Bulls).

However, there are some comebacks that have been successful. Think Dara Torres who returned to the sport of swimming and won a gold medal at the Olypmics at the age of 40. Think the Red Sox during the 2004 playoffs when they were down 3 games to none to the Yankees. They were able to come back and win 4 games in a row to claim the American League Championship Series before going on to be crowned World Series champions.

So while I don’t know if my comeback will be a mistake or a triumph, I am willing to take my chances. Stay tuned for a lot of exciting posts!

Hitting the Refresh Button

I just spend my morning at work, sitting at my computer hitting the refresh button on my computer every 10 seconds. What is the cause of this obsessive compulsive action you ask? Lance Armstrong.

I have been a Lance fan from the beginning. But then again, who wasn’t. Anyone who has the ability to transform a sport, through complete domination automatically gains the curiosity, and most often, support from the public. Lance did just that with his historic 7 Tour De France wins. However, what makes Lance’s story so much more spectacular is the fact that he did this, after beating another opponent: cancer.

In October 1996 he was diagnosed with testicular cancer, with a tumor that had metastasized to his brain and lungs. His cancer treatments included brain and testicular surgery and extensive chemotherapy, and his prognosis was originally poor. He went on to win the Tour de France each year from 1999 to 2005, and is the only person to win seven times.

During his treatment, before his recovery, before he even knew his own fate, he created the Lance Armstrong Foundation. This marked the beginning of Lance’s life as an advocate for people living with cancer and a world representative for the cancer community. With their now infamous yellow wristbands, the Livestrong organization strives to ‘to inspire and empower’ cancer sufferers and their families. The foundation also aims to provide practical information and tools for cancer sufferers in a, public health and research. With over 70 million wristbands sold, the foundation is known around the world and it making a real difference in the lives of cancer patients.

Lance is an inspiration. While I don’t always support all of the decisions he makes, he is the type of person that you want to root for. He represents so much more than winning.

I hope that my commitment to the Pan Mass Challenge can help to make a difference, no matter how small, in the lives of cancer patients. While my fundraising is off to a slow start, I am confident that the support I have seen in the past, will return. For those of you who have already generously make your donation, I thank you. You will be in my thoughts as I ride across the state, and your actions will be felt at the Dana Farber Center.

To make a donation, please visit my profile here: DONATE HERE!

While Lance’s efforts today did not result in a stage win, in my mind, he is still the best rider in the Tour de France . LIVESTRONG!