A Bed Fit for a Princess (and Prince)

When Matt and I moved in together my sleep quality plummeted. I tend to move around when I sleep and Matt is a very light sleeper. This is a deadly combination for any married couple.

Every few weeks, one of us would end up sleeping on the couch. Not really the ideal way to start a marriage. After complaining about this to my colleagues for months on end, they finally convinced me that I need to do something about it.

So two weeks ago, after returning from vacation, Matt and I entered the world of adulthood and bought a big kid bed. After spending 2 hours in Sleepys, testing out nearly ever mattress, we decided on a Serta. We were having trouble deciding whether or not we should get a spring or tempur-pedic mattress. This one has a spring mattress with a tempur-pedic pillow top – the perfect solution.

The sheep was really the biggest selling point for me. Unfortunately it wasn’t until after we purchased the bed that I realized he didn’t come with it.

Matt made a big push for us to upgrade to a King. Although our bedroom isn’t really big enough to reasonably fit a bed this size, his argument that 90% of the time we spend in our bedroom is in the bed was pretty convincing.

So now we have a room with a bed in it –  a lot of bed!

 

Oh yeah… and some bikes. Isn’t city living the best?

Jazz Aspen Snowmass

We ended our weekend on a high note with good music, great friends and amazing memories.

Jazz Aspen Snowmass was absolutely incredible. Although I don’t have a ton of concert experience to compare this to, I am pretty confident that this festival was up there. Being outdoors, surrounded by the mountains, listening to great music – not much beats that in my book.

Friday night we saw Steve Miller Band and Sugarland and the second night was Trombone Shorty and Mumford and Sons.

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Ryan. I can’t wait to celebrate 31!

 

 

Downhill

Yes – I’m still recapping our trip to Colorado. Seriously, it feels like we were there for a year with everything we did!

Our friends were arriving in Denver on Friday and meeting us in Snowmass that afternoon. So that gave Matt and I the morning to pack up, check in to our new condo, do some laundry and hit up the grocery store. Plenty of time to find in one more activity, right?

Since we had such much fun mountain biking the first time, we decided to do that again. Plus we’d heard that Snowmass had just opened some awesome trails so it seemed like a perfect idea.

At the rental shop, Matt and I were surprised to see so many people renting shin guards, wrist guards, padded shirts and helmets with face masks. In Telluride, we just rented bikes and helmets and were fine. Yes – I did fall a couple of times but I am not sure a face mask was necessary, I never went more than 5 mph! So when they asked us if we wanted the “safety package” we laughed and opted out.

When Matt and I took the bikes for a quick test spin around the sidewalk, we both immediately asked for our bike seats to be raised. The guys who worked at the rental store told us that they were actually at the right height, “since you aren’t sitting when you are riding, it doesn’t matter that much.”

Umm, what? No sitting? What are you talking about.

We took their word for it and headed to the gondola. As we rode up the mountain, I started to realize that Matt and I were the only people who didn’t have safety gear on. Everyone else was decked out in hardcore gear, while I was wearing spandex bike shorts and a lululemon bike shirt. I couldn’t figure out what was going on. Was this just the different between Telluride and Aspen?

I decided to google “different types of mountain biking.” The results showed me that there are multiple types of mountain biking:  cross country (XC), trail riding, all mountain, downhill, freeride, slopestyle, dirt jumping and trials. What we had done in Telluride was cross country. Commonly defined by the terrain on which it is performed, XC courses and trails consist of a mix of rough forest paths and singletrack, smooth fireroads, and even paved paths connecting other trails. Cross-country bicycles are some of the lightest mountain bikes, typically between 15 and 35 lb. They usually feature suspension forks in front and sometimes have suspension in the rear.

What we were about to was downhill. Downhill biking is a time trial mountain biking event held on a course with a net decrease in elevation. As the name of this discipline implies, downhill races are held on steep, downhill terrain, resulting in high speed descents and, most commonly, with extended air time off jumps and other obstacles. Modern downhill bikes weigh between 30 and 42 pounds, and usually feature full-suspension and frame geometries that lean back farther  than other mountain bikes.

Suddenly, I was in a whole new world.

We began to make our way down “Easy Rider” a begin track. It took me a little to get used to the bike and after about 2 minutes of squatting over my bike (remember – you are really supposed to sit down) my thighs were burning. But even though it was physically challenging, and I was going ridiculously slow, I liked it. This was definitely something I could get into. and let’s face it, that face mask helmet makes me look bad ass.

 

After a few runs I was feeling pretty good about myself. So at the end of the day, we decided to take on an expert level course, Valhalla, the newest and Snowmass’ signature downhill trail.

And yes, you better believe it that Matt and I looked this intense going down it!

 

So look out, I’m planning to make my downhill debut at the X Games! Let’s just hope the sport is ready for me.

Butterflies

She planted dill for swallow-tails
and milkweed where monarchs would lay
their caterpillar offspring round
the grass green meadows of May.

The migrants returned then as always;
how quickly her crops were consumed!
but countless chrysalides dotted the dell
tucked inside their golden cocoons.

Then early one morning she beckoned
us watch the mystery unfold;
the metamorphosis almost complete
translucent shells gave up their gold.

Wet wings greeted the rising sun
and the warmth of a soft summer breeze,
soon butterflies coloured meadow and wood
floating gracefully throughout the trees.

She told us of unseen transcendings
as we watched the born-agains soar;
so certain were we then of heaven
as if we had been there before.

J.D. Deutschendorf

Maroon Bells

On our second day in Telluride, we decided to visit Maroon Lake, to take in the sights of Maroon Bells, two peaks in the Elk Mountains about 12 miles from Aspen. The view of the Maroon Bells to the southwest from the Maroon Creek valley is one of the most famous scenes in Colorado, and is reputed to be the “most-photographed spot in Colorado” and one of Colorado’s premier scenic overlooks. Naturally, we needed to go and see this view for ourselves.

We rented bikes and took a bus to the lake. During the ride up, we passed multiple bikers who were making the 8 mile climb to the lake. Suddenly we felt pretty pathetic riding up in the bus. To be honest, I blame the guy at the bike shop. Clearly he should have looked at us, realized that Matt was an Ironman, and suggest that we ride up. Unfortunately, he looked at us, thought “tourists” and gave us a pair of hybrid bikes and told us to ride the 8 miles downhill. Honestly – there’s nothing worse than being pegged as a tourist. You miss out on all of the “insider-fun.”

Once we arrived, we piled out of the bus (feeling very touristy) and headed over to the lake to snap a few pictures (again, feeling touristy).

Next we ventured down the crater lake trail, a 1.8 mile trail that brings you to another small lake/pond. More incredible sights means more incredible pictures.

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One of my favorite things in Colorado was all of the aspen trees. At first I thought they were birch trees (the state tree of New Hampshire!) but then I quickly realized that these trees were different.

The ride down the mountain was fun – we pretty much went the entire 8 miles without pedaling once. Weeeeeee!

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The Meatball Shack

For the second half of our trip, Matt and I ventured over to Aspen. The drive over was beautiful and Matt booked us in an awesome hotel, The Limelight. After checking in and showering off our failure from the 14er, we took to the town.

Aspen has a very different feel than Telluride. Gone were the small coffee shops and in were the high-end designer stores and trendy restaurants. While in Telluride, we fit in with our jeans and fleeces, in Aspen, we stood out. And not for the right reason.

After a quick drink at Jimmy’s (I highly recommend the margarita), we settled on The Meatball Shack for dinner.

 

This relatively new restaurants combines different meats and sauces into unique and delicious meatballs. We went with the classic beef with marinara sauce and the chicken with buffalo sauce. While both were delicious, I have a special place in my tummy for buffalo.

I wasn’t planning on ordering desert until I saw the menu.

Design your own cookie? Yes, please! Matt and I went with the original cookie dough with health bar  and salted caramel topping.

Oh yeah, and with a scoop of homemade ice cream on top. It was heavenly. And gone in about 2 seconds.

How didn’t I think of this idea? Maybe I can create the NYC version.